George McGovern and George F. Will both support secret ballot for workers

Conservative Washington Post columnist recently commented about a proposed change to labor law that would take away the right of workers to a secret ballot when deciding whether or not they want to unionize.  He said:

The exquisitely misnamed Employee Free Choice Act would strip from workers their right to secret ballots in unionization elections. Instead, unions could use the “card check” system: Once a majority of a company’s employees—each person confronted one on one by a union organizer in an inherently coercive setting—sign cards expressing consent, the union would be certified as the bargaining agent for all workers. Proving that the law’s purpose is less to improve workers’ conditions than to capture dues payers for the unions, the law would forbid employers from discouraging unionization by giving “unilateral”—not negotiated—improvements in compensation and working conditions.

Will suggested that this was likely to be passed into law unless either McCain becomes president and can veto it or Republicans in the Senate can maintain a filibuster, which requires 40 votes to sustain.  But not all Democrats support the Orwellian-named bill.  George McGovern, the liberal former Senator  who lost the 1972 presidential in a landslide to Richard Nixon, opposes the measure so strongly that he appears in a new 60-second ad against it.

I agree with the Georges; this is a bad bill.  Write your representatives and senators!

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2 comments so far

  1. […] time friend of labor rights, is opposed to the measure and appears in a television ad against it, as I recently blogged.  This measure is undemocratic; it is about increasing the power of labor leaders, not […]

  2. […] a probable reference to the very undemocratic card check system, which I blogged about critically here and here. The measure in question would reduce worker’s ability to decide whether or not to […]


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